What does links mean in golf

what does links mean in golf

What are the Differences between a Links Course and a Parkland Golf Course?

Jun 08,  · "Links" and "links course" are terms that refer to a specific style of golf course whose hallmarks include being built on sandy soil along a coastline. Links courses are buffeted by strong winds that require deep bunkers to prevent the sand from blowing away. They are . A links golf course is the oldest style of course. The word “links” is derived from ancient Scotland and refers to an area along a coast that often includes sand dunes and few, if any, trees. One.

It is used generally to refer to the course that golf is played on. It also has a more technical meaning, referring to a particular type or style of golf course. Viewed from above, a golf course, with its many kidney shaped fairways and greens, can look a little like a string of sausages. Why a cat? Who knows? Half of golf terms seem to be birdsso why not throw a cat in there? Although the very first golf-like games may have been played in what is now the Netherlands as early asgolf historians tend to trace a direct line from Scotland in the s to today.

Golf must have been a fairly common sport by the mids and just as addictive as its modern counterpart, because in it was officially prohibited by the King of Scotland. Early golf enthusiasts faced how to solve normal distribution problems difficulties.

As we already know, golf was outlawed at times, but even when it was legal, you needed a lot of uninhabited, non-farm land to play it on. The solution that many Scottish golfers found was to create courses near the shore, where the earth was sandy and the water brackish.

Useless for farming, this land was ideal for the sport in many ways. The hard ground also encouraged the ball to bounce and roll further. The landscape also came with many natural impediments to golf — wind and rain blowing in from the sea, small streams that ran through the land and sandier patches that stopped the grass from growing and the ball from rolling.

Instead of resisting these features, golfers embraced the challenge, and indeed, water hazards and sand traps are the two main artificially created obstacles on modern golf courses. Golf is no longer illegal and there are courses spread around the world in every environment imaginable. Although it can be used as a general term, links has retained its meaning as being descriptive of a certain style of golf course set in a particular type of environment.

The most obvious visual difference between a non-links and a links course is that a links course will have few or how to tell if steering stabilizer is bad trees. Water and sand are the key obstacles in all styles of golf course, but on links courses, they are either naturally occurring or carefully designed to give that impression.

A key difference on links courses is the presence of some very dramatic walls that hold a green back from a sandy bunker. As a result of the topographical and environmental differences, success on a links course requires different techniques from other courses. Tina Mickelson addresses this on a post she wrote for the PGA website. She identifies three key differences:.

Your email address will not be published. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Skip to content. She identifies three key differences: Because of the wind on links courses, players should drive the ball the first and usually longest shot on any given hole with a lower trajectory than on other courses. The sand how to get enough calories on a vegan diet on links courses tend to be much more treacherous than on other courses.

Mickelson recommends practicing very high shots out of sand, to get over the walls, and extreme prudence. Thanks for reading, Ezra Fischer. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. Next Next post: How to plan for the week of July ,

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Jul 17,  · The term, “links” has two meanings within golf. It is used generally to refer to the course that golf is played on. A golfer might say to a friend of hers, “sorry, I can’t come over and collect kindling with you because I’m going to hit the links today. It also has a more technical meaning, referring to a particular type or style of golf course. Jul 31,  · Firstly, a links style golf course is the oldest style of course you can play. The word “links” is derived from old Scotland and refers to an area along a coast that includes sand dunes or high fescue and very few, if any, trees. Back in that time course designers had limited resources for moving ground and shaping a course to their liking. Apr 29,  · A links golf course is regarded today as a golf course that has few trees, a lot of wind, thick grasses or thick heather, and a lot of bunkers. They are built on sandy soil and in most cases are on a coastline of a body of water. The term “links” actually has Scots origins and means “rising ground” or “ridge”.

Often, people mistakenly believe a links golf course is synonymous with any golf course. While it's true that a links golf course has all the characteristics of a standard golf course, links golf courses have several characteristics that make them unique.

The name "links" originated in Scotland. It's a derivative of the word "hlinc. While they can be made inland under the right circumstances, typically links golf courses are found along a coastline.

And while a few links courses have been developed around lakes, the majority are alongside oceans and seas. Most links courses have rolling hills, sand dunes and bunkers, tall grass and few trees for a landscape, an inherent result of the waterfront setting. One purpose of almost every golf course is a beautiful setting, and links courses are famous for being picturesque.

By definition, links courses are designed around the natural hazards of a coastal landscape. While the sand bunkers of desert and parkland courses are added during the excavation, sand dunes and bunkers exist naturally on a links course. Though some trees may exist on a links course, they're rarely added if they weren't already there.

Another hazard associated with links courses is high winds, a product of both being on the coast and the lack of wind breaks. Not to be forgotten, the ocean is an impressive hazard as well. In addition to the many other qualities that make links courses attractive, short distances between the green and the next tee box is another. Since the geography of a links course runs in a straight line along a coast, long walks between the last hole and the next tee box are rare.

In fact, sometimes the walk around a hazard -- an inland cove, for example -- is considerably longer than the green-to-tee distance. While it's true that all of the qualities inherent in a links course can be found on a parkland or desert course, it's the preponderance of them that separates a links course from the other two.

A course that is on a coastline, has large natural sand bunkers, dunes and tall grass, has a noticeable lack of trees, and uses the ocean as both a view and a hazard is probably a links course.

Live Healthy Sports. By Ryan Hotchkiss. Coastline Setting While they can be made inland under the right circumstances, typically links golf courses are found along a coastline. Natural Hazards By definition, links courses are designed around the natural hazards of a coastal landscape.

Easy Walking In addition to the many other qualities that make links courses attractive, short distances between the green and the next tee box is another. General Traits While it's true that all of the qualities inherent in a links course can be found on a parkland or desert course, it's the preponderance of them that separates a links course from the other two. References Golf-Basics-for-Women.

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