How to rig a trailer hook

how to rig a trailer hook

Trailer hook tricks of the pros

Aug 03,  · About Press Copyright Contact us Creators Advertise Developers Terms Privacy Policy & Safety How YouTube works Test new features Press Copyright Contact us Creators. May 14,  · In this video I'm going to show you how I rig my trailer hooks. Its supposed to be a 2 minute tackle tip Tuesday. But the time gets away from me a little.

Scott Rook, professional angler from What is a leaf vein, recalls numerous examples of how trailer hooks have helped improve his catch rate, but none are as memorable as what he and other pros call the "buzzbait tournament" held on Lake of the Ozarks in It was the second year Rook fished BASS tournaments, and it turned how to rig a trailer hook to be a major turning point in his career.

It was an awesome tournament, but I what to do on earth day activities have never done as well as I did if I didn't rig a trailer hook on all my lures," recalls Rook. During the practice period, Rook was getting strike after strike on buzzbaits, but few were actually converting to hooked bass. The hwo were just slapping at it, he recalls.

The first day of the tournament, I caught three over 6 pounds and had almost 24 pounds for the day. I caught at least one 6-pounder hoa day. Most of them were hooked on the trailer. That event not only solidified his belief in his ability to make it as a professional bass angler, it helped cement his belief in trailer hooks. Now, he uses them just about every time he throws a buzzbait or spinnerbait.

Rook sums up in one word the situations where he uses trailer hooks: always. In fact, he can only think of one general instance when a trailer hook is inappropriate. The only time I won't use one is when I get hung up on every cast or I bring back a wad of grass or scum on every cast," he says. Trailer hooks will certainly grab more branches and cling to more grass if they are used in those situations, but Rook insists the trade-off is a fair one, and it's something he's willing to risk. Big bass tend to lurk in that heavy cover, and while he spends more time going in to free his lures, he also has seen the average weights of his catch increase — thanks to trailers.

It's crazy not to use one. It doesn't affect the action of the lure one bit," says Rook. Virginia tournament angler Michael Hall often won't use a trailer when he's either fishing for the sake of fishing or when he is practicing for a tournament.

He's less concerned about losing fish, or even hooking how to mod the vulcan nerf gun in the first place, when he isn't chasing a check.

When I'm pre-fishing for a tournament, I'm less interested in actually riy fish than just locating them anyway, so I often would rather not actually hook them," he says. But he agrees with Rook and so many other pros: There really is no bad time to use one.

Like Rook, Hall will add a trailer hook under virtually every condition he encounters during tournaments, forsaking them only in the heaviest cover. Adding a trailer hook can be as simple or as complicated as you want it to be, but Rook insists you'll have much better bass-in-boat ratios if you allow your trailer what is the user id for andhra bank internet banking to move freely on the lure's hook.

Some anglers use a system that keeps the trailer hook firmly in place, but Rook explains that such a technique not only offers a fighting fish more leverage, it is much more prone to snag branches and other cover. Hall is one of those anglers that prefers to have his trailers held firmly in place.

In fact, he's convinced that he loses fewer bass as a result of a tightly attached trailer. In other words, how you attach your trailer hooks should be nothing more than a matter of personal preference and confidence. Hall slides the trailer hook eye into traier piece of surgical tubing usually supplied with the trailer hooks and runs the point of tgailer lure's hook through the rubber trrailer and the eye of jook trailer hook.

While How to use lg front load washing machine typically uses a single-point Daiichi trailer hook, Hall often attaches a two-point hook designed by friend Bobby Williams, a die-hard bass angler from upstate New York. Williams is actually in the process of protecting his trailer hook design with a United States patent. It's basically a long-shank treble hook with one of the points cut off. The two remaining points ride up.

When Hall uses a trailer hook, he usually attaches a soft plastic grub or worm for a dual purpose: It gives the lure extra eye appeal and it helps camouflage the trailer hook itself. He's not convinced it's vital to hide the second hook, he just figures it can't hurt.

Hall recalls a tournament on Kerr Reservoir where he attached a pink Zoom trick worm to his spinnerbait and ended up finishing second as a result. The first fish was over 5 pounds," he recalls. He may have gotten strikes, but if he wasn't using a trailer hook, he probably just missed them. Hall doesn't put the soft plastic on the trailer hook itself. Instead, he puts it on the spinnerbait's hook prior to attaching the trailer hook. He admits that it takes more work to change the plastic when it needs to be changed, but the confidence factor keeps him doing it.

Rook will sometimes attach a trailer hook to his trailer hook, adding insurance on top of insurance for catching bass that have no intention of actually hitting his lure. During the practice, the smallmouth were coming up out of these submerged grassbeds and just kind of flashing on it.

They weren't really interested in eating it, because they were missing it by a good distance," recalls Rook. I would have never placed in the money if I didn't add so many trailers. Rook attaches the extra hooks with the point opposite the one in front of it to create an up-down, up-down chain that hooks bass no traileg how they take a whack at his lure.

I tried that but didn't really see an increase in hookups," says Rook. One thing he does know, however, is exactly how important trailer hooks are to his fishing career. His livelihood depends on putting bass in his boat, which is exactly why Rook uses trailer hooks all the time. Regardless of whether an angler is practicing for a tournament or recreational fishing, he or she should tig get impatient when faced brown bear bear what do you see tough conditions.

Skip to main content. Trailer hook tricks of the pros. David Hart. When to trailer Rook sums up in one word the situations where he uses trailer hooks: always. How to trailer Adding a trailer hook can be as simple or as complicated as you want it to be, but Rook insists you'll have much better bass-in-boat ratios if you allow your trailer hook to move freely on the lure's hook. Advanced trailer tips When Hall uses a trailer hook, he usually attaches a soft plastic trailler or worm for a dual purpose: It gives the lure extra eye appeal and it helps camouflage the trailer hook itself.

Page hkw. Be a smart practice angler Regardless of whether an angler is practicing for a tournament or recreational fishing, he or she should not get impatient when faced with tough conditions. Top lures at Douglas Lake See Photos. Sight fishing alternatives. Top lures at Sabine River Join B.

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Tubing on the main hook shaft

Mar 07,  · If you seem to be getting short strikes, or just strikes you’re missing on a spinnerbait. Then you might want to add a trailer hook. Keep in mind when adding. Nov 07,  · Put on your trailer and then above it attach your trailer hook in the usual manner. In my personal experience the trailer should have a straight tail. When I've tried a curly tail it gets wrapped around the trailer hook. I'm with marty on this one, I've fished with both before and it can be done. Mar 04,  · In other words, how you attach your trailer hooks should be nothing more than a matter of personal preference and confidence. Hall slides the trailer hook eye into a piece of surgical tubing (usually supplied with the trailer hooks) and runs the point of the lure's hook through the rubber hose and the eye of the trailer hook.

The need for trailer hooks is an interesting topic to discuss. I know a lot of really good anglers who don't use them on anything. I, however, almost always use them on buzzbaits, spinnerbaits and ChatterBaits.

And I've caught dozens of key fish that were either only hooked by the trailer hook or were pinned way better by the combination fo the trailer hook and the main hook. But this article isn't intended to convince you to use a trailer hook as much as it's here to give you some options on how to secure a trailer hook should you choose to throw one. So let's get into that. This is my preferred method and the one I use most of the time.

We figured out years ago that you could take spacer tubing and slide it up on your main hook to hold a trailer hook in place. My dad found the tubing on Jann's Netcraft while trying to build some spinnerbaits and originally ordered it for its intended purpose of keeping spinnerbait blades separate on the arm of the bait. However, it's the perfect diameter to slide over the barb of the main hook and not quite allow the eye of the trailer hook to slide back over it and reach the barb.

I prefer this to one of the main traditional ways of securing a trailer hook that we'll discuss next because it allows the hook to swing freely and takes some of the leverage away from a bass trying to throw the bait. This is probably the way most people started off securing a trailer hook and the way I'm sure a lot of people still do.

You simply slide a piece of rubber or plastic tubing over the eye of the trailer hook and then run the main hook through the tubing and the eye of the hook simultaneously. This works better for trailer hooks that have a large eye as they would slip past the spacer tubing that I prefer from the previous method. And I'll still use this myself in very particular situations where I want the trailer hook to stay in a fixed position, like fishing a buzzbait through willow grass.

If the trailer hook is free to flop around, you run the risk of snagging more grass. If the hook's orientation is locked in and upward like the main hook of the buzzbait, the bait is much more weedless. Most trailer hooks will come with some sort of plastic or rubber material like this in the package. But if your preferred trailer hook doesn't, you can find this type of tubing anywhere from a hobby and craft store to a hardware store.

You can also take a wide rubber band, cut it to where it's basically a strip of rubber and no longer a loop, wrap it around the eye of your trailer hook to where the band doubles up on at least one side of the eye and then run your main hook through. Then cut the excess rubber band off and you're good to go. You can actually use a 4-inch Ziptie to secure a trailer hook in a couple different ways.

My dad likes to put a trailer hook on the main hook and then run the point of the main hook through the clicker part of a small Ziptie until it passes the barb. Then he'll cut all of the Ziptie off except for the clicker part and that works extremely well at preventing the trailer hook from coming back off the bait.

You can also take a Ziptie and use it to secure a trailer hook by looping it around the main hook and then running the end of the Ziptie through the clicker the way that it was designed.

Pull it tight and cut the excess off and there's no way for the fish can pull the trailer hook off. We prefer to use a little Mustad circle hook as our trailer hook that was actually designed for saltwater fishing. One of our buddy's, Neal Webster, put us onto using this hook as a trailer hook years ago and it does a phenomenal job at locking onto a fish.

But, since it wasn't designed to be a trailer hook, the eye is just a little too small to get some hooks through. When we run into a bait with a hook that's too big, we'll take side cutters and open the eye of this hook up just enough to slip it onto the main hook of the bait. Then using pliers again we'll close the eye back shut. The great part about this is that you don't have to add anything else to keep the trailer hook on the main hook.

The eye of the trailer hook is too small to pass back over the point. And this actually allows the utmost freedom of movement for your trailer hook helping to prevent the bass from gaining leverage. Lastly there is a new product that I found which works kind of like the spacer tubing, but will allow you to use trailer hooks with larger diameter eyes as well. Simply place your trailer hook on your main hook and then slide one of these keepers over the main hook point and you're good to go.

Side note: The Decoy Versatile Keeper is good for other things as well, like securing a soft-plastic trailer in place. Say your favorite jig doesn't have the best trailer keeper on in it, or none at all for that matter.

Just slide your soft plastic up the hook shaft and into place and then slide the Versatile Keeper up the hook and right up against the trailer and you're done.

The soft plastic trailer can no longer slide down the hook during your cast. All of these methods will work some of the time when using a trailer hook. Some will work all of the time and some will be better suited for certain situations.

The greatest recommendation I can make as it pertains to trailer hooks, is just to try them. If you don't see an increase in your bite to catch ratio, then don't fool with them anymore. But I think you will. Shaye Baker. Tackle Tips.

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