How to play paso doble on guitar

how to play paso doble on guitar

Pasodoble Los Encaidenados

Jan 13,  · Flavio Sala plays Paso Doble Flamenco by Gerardo alldatingloveen.com://alldatingloveen.comE GUITAR LESSONS WITH FLAVIO:alldatingloveen.com M. James Horner- Pasodoble (Tango from the Mask of Zorro ))Hi there! All credits to my music teacher Jorge Jara! He figured out the whole thing, enjoy and have fun Intro: Am-B7-Em Em - B7.

Whereas in night clubs in New York dancers might be dancing the salsa, or in Buenos Aires the Tango, in Paris people young and old alike dance the Paso Doble socially. It isn't often taught to beginner Latin Dancers in some parts of the world, which is a shame, because it is truly the easiest of the five Latin dances, even easier than Rumba.

Sadly, when dancers postpone learning the Paso Doble until they reach a high level, they find they are far behind those who started earlier. Therefore, in this BGBB, I'm going to prove to you just how easy Paso Doble is, show you how you can learn this dance on your own, and challenge you to take it to the next level.

If you are a Man, stand on your Left Foot; if you are a Lady, on your right. This is the first rule you have to learn: the Man always starts stepping with his right foot, and the Lady with her left. Now just take tiny steps in place on the ball of the foot, counting That is Paso Doble - seriously! Step as described above, and without moving. That is called the Sur Place. Take tiny steps forward.

That is called the Basic Movement Forward. Take tiny steps back. That is called the Basic Movement Back. Travel to the left, dancing side, close, side close. That is called a Chasse to the Left. Travel to the right, dancing close, side, close, side.

That is called the Chasse to the Right. Now you've learnt five figures! What's more, any of these figures can gradually turn either to the left or the right, and if you want, you can always end the final step in Promenade Position by just turning your bodies slightly and opening up.

Click on any of the figures above to see a video performance of that figure. In addition to taking these tiny steps, we can use regular walking steps in Paso Doble. The Lady will mirror the Man. That figure is called the Attackand is used just to move from one place to another on the floor. What makes this different from the Basic Movement Forward is that all the steps are regular length walking steps, instead of tiny steps on the balls of the feet. You can also walk in Promenade Position.

Starting in Promenade Position, do the same thing as above, but this time with both dancers going forward. The What is the song american pie by don mclean about will dance the natural opposite.

That figure is called the Promenade Close. The Appel is a fun part of How to play paso doble on guitar Doble, where essentially the first step turns into a stamping of the foot on the floor in place. Because Paso Doble represents the bullfight, the Appel represents the matador's call to the bull, but in dancing, it is essentially used as a signal to the Lady which the Man uses to let her know he is about to start moving. Take the Deplacement, and turn the first step into an Appel.

Now that figure is called the Attack instead of the Deplacement. It isn't really necessary that you remember the names, just that you see that all of Paso Doble is made up of just a few simple movements. Using only the figures discussed above, try this basic routine. Just so you don't get lost counting 1.

If you'd like some Paso Doble music to dance to, check out this Youtube playlist Paso Doble is almost always danced to the same song. This routine isn't particularly complicated or fancy, but it is real Paso Doble! Use the other figures discussed above to make a routine of your very own. All of Paso is made up of these simple steps. How to control your anger towards your boyfriend terms of technique, Paso Doble is the simplest of all the dances.

The next time a Paso Doble comes up at a social dance, try it out. Paso Doble is a really fun dance, and it's easy to learn. Give it a try, and let me know how it goes in the comment section below! Walking In addition to taking these tiny steps, we can use regular walking steps in Paso Doble. The Appel The Appel is a fun part of Paso Doble, where essentially the first step turns into a stamping of the foot on the floor in place.

Beginner Routine Using only the figures discussed above, try this basic routine. Forward - Tiny steps Closed 1. Back Gradual turn to L Tiny steps Closed 1. The Next Step All of Paso is made up of these simple steps. BallroomGuide gmail. Syllabus Quickstep Dodgers. Syllabus Foxtrot Dodgers. Tango: Staccato vs. Static and Dynamic Balance. Make your Basic Standard Look Advanced.

Principles of the Double Reverse. How to Build a Latin Routine. What to Look for in a Partner. How to Build a Standard Routine.

Afrika - Se Nos Van (pasodoble)

Paso Doble tabs, chords, guitar, bass, ukulele chords, power tabs and guitar pro tabs including computerliebe. [C Db Gm Eb Ab Gb Fm F Bb Bbm D] Chords for Pasodoble with capo transposer, play along with guitar, piano, ukulele & mandolin. [Intro] C/G A7 Dm G7 C/G Em F G7 C/G G7 C/G [Verse] C/G G7 Y Cuando yo era un tonto, Cadiz me soplo y me dio la inteligencia C/G Y cuando estaba histerico y desesperado me dio la paciencia.

Paso Doble is almost always danced to one song: the Spanish Gypsy Dance a. Even when other songs are used at competition, however, they always have the same phrasing.

By knowing the phrasing, you can predict exactly when the dramatic parts of the song will occur, when the fast and slow parts are, and when the song will end. This allows you to choreograph a routine that fits the song perfectly, and makes you more musical. Look at any professional Paso Doble event and you will see that everyone's routines are choreographed exactly to the music, and with the knowledge you get here today, you should be able to do the same.

If you are unfamiliar with the Spanish Gypsy Dance, it's time to change that. You should know every beat and every note of this song by heart. Listen to it as you brush your teeth, hum along as you drive to work. You need to know this song backward and forward, because if your routine is choreographed to this song and you need to stop on the floor because somebody gets in your way, you will need to recommence your routine from a new part of the song, not from where you left off, because the music isn't going to wait for you.

Below is a chart depicting the phrasing and counts. Play the video above to listen to the song, and try to use this chart to count along through the song at the same time. The first thing you may have noticed about the chart above is that some of the numbers are coloured.

Let's talk right now about the red and blue. The red counts represent highlights, and the blue counts represent rests.

The highlights are emphatic parts of the music that you need to show in your dancing through some emphatic figures, such as the Spanish Lines. The rests are short silences in the music that allow the emphasis of the highlight to set in, and allow you to hold the highlight for longer.

Notice that when the highlights occur, everyone uses dramatic figures that have a lot of impact. Although some people decide not to use a dramatic figure for the first highlight, you can see that Riccardo and Yulia chose to show all three highlights in their routine. The other colour you noticed in the chart above green represented the flamenco section. It is very popular to show the music in this section by dancing a mini-flamenco choreography essentially Spanish tap dancing.

Go back to the video of Riccardo and Yulia dancing, and you will see that Riccardo dances flamenco steps twice - at the beginning of each of the phrases coloured in green skip to in the video to see this. In the Syllabus, this is a great place to use the Coup de Pique or the Flamenco Taps , each of which can fit this section of the music. If you have read our post on Musicality and Phrasing , you'll know that songs typically group into phrases of four and eight measures consistently, but this song breaks those rules.

Notice that the majority of the phrases have eight beats, but there are some strange ones, which are underlined in the chart above.

Not counting the highlights, there are four instances of this. The first one is a break in the music for four beats, which occurs at the end of the first line of the chart. The second and third instances are on line four, where there is a phrase of eight, then of ten, then of eight, and then of six.

This sort of complex phrasing is common in flamenco music, and it is no wonder it appears in a song called the Spanish Gypsy Dance. Being aware of these strange phrases is important, because most Paso Doble figures take 8 beats to complete, and if you dance them during these extended or shortened phrases, your dancing will look slightly off.

The fourth place this happens is in the second to last measure, where there are five beats. The four beat break at the end of line one is easy to fill, since there are quite a number of Paso figures that take four beats, such as the Drag and the Attack. To fill the phrase that takes 10 beats, you may want to use an eight-beat figure that you can extend for two beats, such as the Grand Circle or the Travelling Spins from PP.

For the phrase of six beats, you could shorten an eight beat figure, such as cutting the last two steps off the Open Telemark which really only exist for phrasing that figure into eight beats anyway.

In all of these instances, also, you could use any combination of the Sur Place , Basic Movement , and Chasses to the Right or the Left , which are the easiest ways of filling as much time as you need. As for the phrase that takes five beats, it isn't too much to worry about.

Typically, Syllabus events end the song at the second highlight, so the song never gets that far. Open choreography has a lot more ways to deal with this strange phrase.

What we have covered today is just the surface of this song. The phrases can be broken down into more complex patterns, different phrases yet uncoloured above represent a preparation for the matador to attack or a parade around the arena. Listen to the music yourself, imagine the bullfight, and picture in your mind what is happening at each stage of the music.

That is the image you want your choreography and your performance to express, and keeping this in mind will help you greatly.

The Phrasing and Counts Below is a chart depicting the phrasing and counts. The Flamenco Section The other colour you noticed in the chart above green represented the flamenco section. Short and Long Phrases If you have read our post on Musicality and Phrasing , you'll know that songs typically group into phrases of four and eight measures consistently, but this song breaks those rules.

This is just the Surface What we have covered today is just the surface of this song. BallroomGuide gmail. Syllabus Quickstep Dodgers. Syllabus Foxtrot Dodgers. Tango: Staccato vs.

Static and Dynamic Balance. Make your Basic Standard Look Advanced. Principles of the Double Reverse. How to Build a Latin Routine. What to Look for in a Partner. How to Build a Standard Routine.



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